IN THE NEWS

Many people adhere to “clean” diets by only eating food in their natural state and avoiding processed foods. According to NPR, though these types of diets help people lose weight, there may be an unintended consequence.

Orthorexia nervosa, a phenomenon coined by Dr. Steven Bratman, describes the anxiety dieters feel as a result of their strict clean eating and how food preferences can take over people’s lives. Dieters suffering from orthorexia nervosa might avoid certain social events in an effort to avoid a situation where they won’t be able to find the “right” foods.

“People would think they should cut out all dairy and they should cut out all lentils, all wheat,” said Bratman. “And it dawned on me gradually that many of these patients, their primary problem was that they were ... far too strict with themselves.”

Sondra Kronberg, founder and executive director of the Eating Disorder Treatment Collaborative, says that, clean eating diets can be very healthy until they begin to interfere with one’s quality of life. Although the eating disorder stems from the desire to eat clean, not to be thin, sometimes dieters with orthorexia nervosa will miss out on essential nutrients in an effort to be healthy.

Those who suspect they might have orthorexia nervosa or another eating disorder should seek professional help and reach out to friends and family.

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STUDY SAYS

Omega-3 lowers risk of coronary heart disease

According to a study published in the Journal of the American Heart Association, marine omega-3 supplementation lowers the risk for cardiovascular disease. The meta-analysis included study-level data from 13 trials. During a mean treatment duration of five years, 3,838 myocardial infarctions, 3,008 coronary heart disease deaths, 8,435 total CHD events, 2,683 strokes, 5,017 CVD deaths, 15,759 total CVD events and 16,478 major vascular events were documented. In the analysis, marine omega‐3 supplementation was associated with significantly lower risk of myocardial infarction

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HEALTHY LIVING

Breaks and recovering from hibernation

For many, one’s desire to exercise and their body’s ability to perform ebbs and flows. According to U.S. News and World Report, it’s important to give yourself a break and listen to your body. When it’s time to stop hibernating, however, here is a list of ways to think about working out that might help. Remembering the good times you had when you were working out and felt in-shape can help motivate you to get off the couch. Likewise, finding a community can push you along. To make the transition back easier, switch up your routine and set a low bar for yourself. There’s no reason to attempt an intense workout right away.

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NUMBER TO KNOW

20% to 30% of children and adolescents tend to skip breakfast.

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